Pondering the requirements for life on Mars

Water on Mars and the Prospect of Martian Life, by Andrew Knoll and John Grotzinger and published in the journal Elements offers a readable and interesting perspective on some of the requirements for life as we know it – and the prospect for finding those conditions on Mars. It is interesting to think about both the chemical requirements and the chemical “poisons” that may encourage or impede the evolution of life as we know it.

Abstract (for more see http://elements.geoscienceworld.org/content/2/3/169.short this is not, however open access.)

“Evidence of water on Mars dates back to the first observations of channeled landscapes made by Mariner 9 and Viking. More recent images from Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Express strikingly confirm that fluids have sculpted the Martian surface at least episodically through its history. The Mars Exploration Rovers Opportunity and Spirit have added evidence for extensive rock-water chemical interactions in the regions where these remote geologists landed, while OMEGA and THEMIS have shown that similar processes took place in many parts of the planet.

Because of the close relationship between water and biological activity on Earth, such observations have been taken as hopeful signs that Mars, as well, might once have supported life and, indeed, might still do so in subterranean oases. There is, however, much more to consider. Water appears to be necessary for life, at least as it exists on Earth and can be contemplated on Mars, but it does not, by itself, insure habitability. In this paper, we review the broader requirements for biological activity as they relate to water and use these to constrain astrobiological inferences about Mars.”

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